Spider Veins Specialist

Vascular Institute of Arizona

Praveen C Balraj, MD, FACS

Vascular and Endovascular Surgery located in Queen Creek, AZ

Spider veins might seem like little more than a skin blemish, but they can indicate an underlying vein disorder. If you have spider veins, Praveen Balraj, MD, FACS, RPVI, of the Vascular Institute of Arizona can help. Dr. Balraj is a board-certified vascular and endovascular surgeon who provides minimally invasive treatments like sclerotherapy and endovenous ablation to get rid of spider veins. Find out how you can benefit from these treatments by calling the Queen Creek, Arizona, office today or booking an appointment online.

Spider Veins Q&A

What are spider veins?

Spider veins are a common skin blemish. They usually show up on your legs and face. They appear as networks of tiny red, blue, or purple blood vessels that look like spider webs.

Spider veins don’t usually cause pain or other symptoms and are often seen as a cosmetic issue. However, they can be a sign of an underlying venous disease.

What causes spider veins?

Spider veins result from chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), the condition that causes varicose veins in larger blood vessels.

CVI develops if the valves in your veins are too weakened or damaged to work properly. Valves are gateways along the veins that open to let blood through then seal shut. They should keep your blood flowing in one direction — back to your heart.

If the valves don’t seal properly in the smallest veins, it allows blood to collect and make the veins visible.

Even if you haven’t got varicose veins, having spider veins is a sign that you might be at risk of developing complications from CVI. As well as causing varicose veins, CVI can eventually lead to leg pain, swelling, and venous ulcers. So it’s worth having your spider veins treated and asking Dr. Balraj to check your vein health.

What is the best treatment for spider veins?

Dr. Balraj offers highly effective sclerotherapy to treat spider veins. This procedure involves injecting tiny quantities of an irritant called a sclerosant into the affected spider veins. The sclerosant makes the walls of your spider veins collapse and seals them off.

After treatment, your body gradually breaks down the veins and disposes of the remains. The blood that would have gone along your spider veins finds another path using healthier veins, so there’s no effect on your circulation.

In addition to sclerotherapy, Dr. Balraj might also use superficial venous ablation. This technique uses laser (light) energy to collapse the spider veins.

Whether your spider veins are a cosmetic nuisance or indicate that you have chronic venous insufficiency, the Vascular Institute of Arizona can help. Call their office today or book an appointment online.